Parramasala – Dance Among the Gum Trees

As Classical Indian Musicians and Dancers explore the world we move into an era of healthy artistic and aesthetic exchanges. We move away from the cocooned interpretations of the artform and plunge into the lap of the undefined borderless zones of pure creativity. What develops from exploring these unchartered waters may be anything from the cerebral to the sublime, the more important thing is we are doing it and doing it with zest, sensitivity and understanding of not only our own art forms but the foreign.

Parramasala, An Australian Festival of South Asian Arts to be held from 4 November to 8 November is an important Local Government venture giving Indian and Australian artists a platform to showcase their cultural expressions where new shall flourish and the ancient worshipped.

Australia’s flirtatious relationship with Indian Music and Dance Performing Arts goes back to the 1930’s if not earlier. It is little known that eminent Australian Dancer Louise Lightfoot spent a decade or more in or around 1937 learning both Bharathanatyam and Kathakali fascinated by both artforms on her way to England. Taking the Western style of ballet and introducing in his dance we have seen Pandit Uday Shankar [brother of famous Sitarist Pandit Ravi Shankar] who on his return from England to India choreographed several dance ballets in the 1930’s incorporating into them the ballet movements that he was really impressed with in England. Thus we see the cultural exchanges going back to the 1930’s. Later we have seen the bringing of many artists who later settled and contributed to the art world in Australia, eminent musicians such as Pandit Ashok Roy, Pandit Suman, Pandit Nirmal Jena and more.

Parramasala is todays voice of the need within the community to recoup with renewed vigour these connections. In keeping with its fascination with Indian dance we shall witness a collaboration between Kathak and Tap Dance in what will be an energetic entrancing fete on the feet of two zesty crafty dancers, whose Broadway tap sensation was a run away success, Pandit Chitresh Das the Kathak Dancer and Jason Samuels Smith the tap dancer. Unbelievable but possible, the intrinsic rhythmic beats of the two will mingle reducing the yawn between the cultures that originated from the courts of the moghal empire with the funky grooves of American Street Dance in an engaging powerful conversation. They perform on the

4 November 2010 8PM – 9:30PM
5 November 2010 8PM – 9:30PM

Venue

Riverside Theatre at Riverside Theatres
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Price

Premium $75, Full $59, Conc $44, Groups of 10 more $47

Click above to book online or call (02) 8839 3399

Parramasala Bharathanatyam bonanza should be a sweeping success which also is to break new ground with a collaboration between Anandavalli and Anil Srinivasan the Pianist and Sikkil Gurucharan the Carnatic Singer. Anandavalli is well known to Australians being the founder guru artist and director of the Lingalayam Dance Company who have presented many collaborations and thematic dances in the past.  Anandavalli shall present a Million Eyes. When I recently talked to Anandavalli, fondly called Valli by many, she told me that as soon as she heard the two musicians, Anil and Sikkil, she was immediately taken by the voice and imagination of their music. It has been a breathtaking experience to choreograph her new work Million Eyes says Ananadavalli. She shall be performing in her style, a happy blend of yet again two styles Indian Dance, Bharathanatyam and Kuchipudi


When

6 November 2010 6:30PM – 7:45PM
7 November 2010 6:30PM – 7:45PM

Venue

Lennox Theatre at Riverside Theatres

View map

Price

Full $49, Conc $39

Click above to book online or call (02) 8839 3399

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